Focused or Diffused

“Will the moon come tonight – be alright to discover – that its light is the sun’s – will it run?”

Who/what is responsible for the light we cast? Is it our bodies or our minds? Is it our choices or our reasoned choice that governs us?

Ponder all we may, what remains is this reality: Today we have choices to make, work to do, and life to live.

Cameras have focusing rings to sharpen what the camera eye sees. Flashlights have adjustable heads that have the ability to create a narrow, focused beam or cast a more diffused, washed light. A nozzle on a hose grants the ability to control not only the pressure, but how the water stream is disbursed. Similarly, when we focus our choices to consider only what is within our control, our decisions have the greatest impact. When we diffuse our choices by trying to control what we cannot, things become blurry, our vision is diffused, and the strength of our abilities becomes weakened by disbursement.

 

Surfacing

When we are down in the depths, we have to realize that getting back to the surface – back to being ourselves – requires patience and time. The awareness of how deep we are is simply the understanding of how deep a breath we need to take in order to start the upward journey. We’ve been down here before, so we already know we have the lung capacity to make it back to the surface. Inhale and move.

Permittere

Permission comes from the Latin root¬†permittere, which means to “let pass, let go or let loose.”

Ironically, we tend to give more permission to the things we hold onto rather than the things we’d be better off letting go.

Side-by-Side

Opinion: a view or judgment formed about something, not necessarily based on fact or knowledge.

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

 

Belief: an acceptance that a statement is true or that something exists.

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

 

Faith: complete trust or confidence in someone or something

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

 

Trust: firm belief in the reliability, truth, ability, or strength of someone or something.

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

 

Emotion: a natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one’s circumstances, mood, or relationships with others. instinctive or intuitive feeling as distinguished from reasoning or knowledge.

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

 

Feeling: an emotional state or reaction. a belief, especially a vague or irrational one.

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

 

Perspective: a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view.

Fact: a thing that is known or proved to be true.

Truth: in accordance with fact or reality. Accurate or exact.

Reality: the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.

Plantare

Plantare is a Latin word that means to plant, or fix in one place. Sometimes we confuse this idea in our lives. We may sometimes feel that we are stuck in one place because of past decisions we’ve made; that we planted ourselves in one spot. The problem with this mindset is expectation. The expectation that we need to be uprooted in order to find ourselves where we want to be. What’s closer to the truth is that a destination is not where we need to ground ourselves. We simply need to be rooted in reality. Once this happens, most troubles dissipate, because the focus is on where we are in the moment, and there’s no thought given to where we’d rather be.

Wrongdoing or Ignorance?

When we observe others doing something that raises our moral and/or ethical hackles, we may have the tendency to see it as an intentional act. However, the grossest wrongdoing is accusing another of wrongdoing when ignorance was the culprit. We then are showing our ignorance in making assumptions. The good news here is that a deep breath and calm mind can fix our perspective, for assuaging the ignorance of others may likely be outside of our sphere of influence. If not, the better news is that there’s a teachable moment for us to seize.

Scene Elevator

Mediocre is defined as “of only moderate quality; not very good.” Synonyms include: ordinary, common, average, adequate, passable, and tolerable. Is this a word we would proudly use to describe our lives? Is mediocrity ever something to strive for? Would we encourage our children to aim for adequacy?

Statistically, if at the end of our lives we were to look back on all our days, surely ordinary days would be the average. However, that doesn’t mean that knowing this should make us not want to push each day towards something more.

Our scenes, the people we spend a majority of our time with, are also the people who inform us of who we are. So the question becomes, “Is it growth or regression to develop tolerance for mediocrity?” Furthermore, if we feel we know the answer, and are choosing to do nothing about it, look inward before lashing out at present company.