Common Sense > Senses

When it comes making decisions based on instinct, it’s important to consider our physiology. Two people are sat next to each other on a roller coaster. Both have sweaty palms, their hearts are racing and they have butterflies in their stomachs. The only difference is that one of them loves roller coasters and the other is terrified of them. It’s the same physiological result for two completely different anticipations – fear and excitement. Our experiences help us train our physiology. We can’t ignore the data.

Similarly, when it comes to making decisions based on instinct, we have to think beyond our immediate emotional response, because that emotional response will soon pass and we’ll be left beholden to any consequences of our decisions made on instinct alone. Sometimes we fear the idea of something more than we’ll actually fear the reality of it. When we choose not to ignore the data of our experiences, and allow our common sense to usurp our surface senses, sound decisions are made. Our fear response is an indicator that we’ll need to demonstrate vulnerability to push through some discomfort, but that’s how we grow.

The Larceny Rescue

If we are not first responders or persons paid to save lives because we are trained to save lives, what then is our intention when we aim to save others from difficult situations that are by no means life threatening? The rescue is about what makes us feel good, which robs the other person/persons from the opportunity to learn from a mistake or difficult situation to navigate. “What are we rescuing?” becomes the question more than, “Who are we rescuing?” In these instances, we are giving first aid to our insecurities, giving them CPR and resuscitating them so they may live to see another day.  Nobody mourns the death of an insecurity. Fear mourns the death of insecurity.